The Chicago Copperhead

Title

The Chicago Copperhead

Subject

Copperhead movement
Clark, James Growdy 1830-1897
Sheet music

Description

Although this item only contains one song, the publication originally contained three satirical anti-Copperhead campaign songs: "The Copperhead of 1864, The Chicago Copperhead and The Copperhead of 1865."

Comparing them to the venomous snake, Republicans coined the word "Copperhead" in denunciation of those Northern Democrats who opposed the war and favored peace with the South.

Creator

Clark, James G.

Publisher

Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum

Date

1864

Contributor

Horace Waters

Rights

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum holds all rights and permissions.

Format

pdf

Language

en

Identifier

300967
839678268

Coverage

New York

Transcription

The Copperhead of 1864. The Chicago Copperhead, and The Copperhead of 1865. BY JAMES G. CLARK.

NEW YORK: Published by HORACE WATERS, 481 Broadway.

Entered according to act of Congress in A.D. 1864 by Horace Waters, in the Clerk's office of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.


2

THE CHICAGO COPPERHEADS. Written and adapted by James G. Clark.

With energy

1. There is a band of Copperhead snakes, Crawling along the northern lakes,

2. There is a snake call'd "Little Mac!" Throwing himself upon his back,

3. The snakes are fill'd with fear and woe, Up salt river they're bound to go,

4. The snakes will all be buried this Fall, Abe is bruising them with his maul,


Ev'ryone has got the shakes, Oh, see 'em crawling.

Ev'ry time he take a tack, Oh, see him crawling.

Satan has got them all in tow, Oh, see 'em crawling.

Each one into his hole will crawl, Oh, see 'em crawling.


3

Trio. Air. Tenor. There is a band of Copperhead snakes, Crawling along the

Bass. There is a band of Copperhead snakes, Crawling along the

Piano.

northern lakes, Ev'ry one has got the shakes, Oh, see em crawling.

northern lakes, Ev'ry one has got the shakes, Oh, see em crawling.


Select Catalogue of Mrs. E.A. Parkhurst's Compositions. 1864. Published by Horace Waters, 481 Broadway, N.Y. 1864.

NORAH DEAREST

Is a charming and popular song with chorus. It is simply arranged in the key of G. "When the stars are brightly shining For above my weary head Softly steal my thoughts to Norah, Norah, sleeping with the dead."

HOW SOFTLY ON THE BRUISED HEART

Is an exquisite little ballad and should be found in every household in the land. It is simple and full of feeling, and easily arranged in the key of B flat. "How softly on the bruised heart A word of kindness falls, And to the dry and parched soul The [?] tear drop falls."

SWEET LITTLE NELL.

This is a fitting companion to "Sweet Evelina," which has been so popular, and which was one of Mrs. Parkhurst's best arrangements. It is spirited in its movement and has a charming chorus. "Oh! talk not of daisies and violets of spring, Of rose-buds and dew-drops or any such thing; For the loveliest flow'ret that grows in the dell Is the dear bonnie maiden they call Little Nell."

THE ANGELS ARE HOVERING NEAR.

This song is beautiful beyond description. The melody is low and sweet, while the Piano accompaniment has a smooth, gliding movement, very charming in its effect. It is arranged in A flat. "When the glow of the sonnet is fused in the sky, And the creep of the twilight at evening is nigh, When the eyelids of darkness are wet with the dew, And the stars are ablaze in the [dawn?] of the blue, The angels are hovering near."

THE BEAUTIFUL ANGEL BAND.

This is another ballad in A flat. The words are very beautiful and the music is finely adapted. Mrs. Parkhurst possesses a most remarkable faculty of interblending words and melody, and she was never more successful than in this song. "Mother, dear Mother, they're calling me now; Behold is the beautiful west, With a [bright crown?] decking each youthful brow, They came down the land of the blest."

I CAN'T FORGET.

This ballad, although simple, is very artistic in style, and is destined to be a favorite in the concert room and parlor. The melody is pure, combined with the richest harmony. Key of C. "Do not chide if found affection Lingers still when hope is past, Weeping tears of deep dejection Where the wrecks of joy are met."

DOST THOU EVER THINK OF ME, LOVE?

This is a song and chorus of the sentimental order, and cannot fail to be popular. It has been pronounced by good judges to be one of the prettiest ballads published. It is in the key of G. "Dost thou every think of me, love? Dost thou ever think of me? Do you still my memory cherish, Though I'm far away from thee?"

ANGEL MARY.

This is a sweet and simple ballad in A flat. The words and music are by Mrs. Parkhurst, and are wedded in such a manner as to give a charm to both. "You are lying low down in your grave, darling, With the mould creeping over your face, And sadly the green willows wave, darling, And sigh o'er your lone resting place. You left us when summer was throwing O'er earth her bright mantle of flowers; But we know in our hearts you were going To a land that is fairer than ours."

WEEP NO MORE FOR LILY.

Song and Chorus in E flat. This is a light sparkling melody in the solo, while the chorus is solemn and rich in its harmony. It contains all the elements of popularity. "Lilly of the valley, modest, sweet and mild, Ever pure and lovely was the gentle child; Sunny hair had Lilly, eyes of azure blue, Footstep soft and gentle as the falling dew. Chorus--Weep no more for Lily: Lily's gone above; Angels came and bore her to their land of love."

MARY FAY.

This is a popular song among the Minstrel bands, and is very fine for a serenade. The chorus is particularly good. Key of B flat. 30 cents each. "Oh! where has she gone, my Mary Fay, My love, my joy, my [pain?]" I would go to the ends of the raging sea To hear her voice again."

THE UNION MEDLEY.

This is an ingenious combination of all the best patriotic songs of the day, and will be popular. 60 cents.

THE TEAR OF LOVE.

This is one of Mrs. Parkhurst's happiest efforts, and when sung by a sympathizing voice cannot fail to draw the tears from every eye. It is arranged in A flat, and ranges from E to F above. "Think not thou e'er hast won a heart, And that heart holds these dear, 'Till it shreds for thee, and thee alone, A pure and heartfelt tear; For a smile of love or a spoken word Ne'er yet affection provided: But when we mark the starting tear, Oh! than we are beloved."

KATY DID, KATY DIDN'T.

This is, as its name indicates, a comic song. It is designed more especially for children, and has elicited shouts of applause wherever it has been sung. It is in the key of D. "Katy did, Katy didn't, Katy did, Katy didn't, Katy did, Katy didn't, Katy didn't She didn't, I know. Katy had an ardent lover, " &c.

THIS HAND NEVER STRUCK ME, MOTHER.

This song is founded on a very beautiful incident, and cannot fail to be popular throughout the land. It is very simple and touching. Key of C. "Chorus.--Would that every loving sister Could say of her darling brother, Whether he were dead or living, This hand never struck me, mother."

THEY DYING DRUMMER.

This is a very touching song and chorus and will be a favorite in every household, particularly those made desolate by death upon the battlefield. It is arranged in the key of D. 30 cents each.

"Chorus.--Have you come to see your darling Die upon the battlefield, Far from home, so sad and lonely? Have you come your boy to shield?"

The following is a list of Mrs. Parkhurst's instrumental compositions:--

"Yankee Doodle," with variations, is not difficult, but very brilliant, and has been played by Mrs. Parkhurst with great applause at over one hundred concerts.

"Morning Dreams," a collection of popular and [?] varied, and especially designed for teaching purposes, viz: "Away with Melancholy," rather difficult, and a most favorite among good players. "Blue Bells of Scotland," very showy, but not difficult. "Sweet Evelina," another great favorite, and exceedingly brilliant. "They Worked Me All the Day," showy and excellent practice for pupils somewhat advanced. The above pieces are 60 cents each.

"Spirit Polka." This is one of the best and most popular polkas ever published. It is excellent for dancing and possesses the charm of never growing old. It is full of melody and easily arranged in A flat.

"Summer House of Roses." A Galop very spirited and beautifully arranged. Key of C.

"Airy Castles," a Romance. This is one of those charming, silvery pieces, that once heard cannot be forgotten, and will always be a favorite with the young ladies.

"The Cloud with a Silver Lining." Another Romance of the same character as the above.

"General Scott's Farewell March." As easy march and a fine arrangement for young pupils. 25 cents.

"The Sanitary Fair Polka." Composed for the Sanitary Fair, and dedicated to the patrons. This is one of Mrs. Parkhurst's most successful efforts. It is simple, full of melody and exquisite harmony, and fine for dancing. 25 c. The Brooklyn Eagle says:-- "The music is bright, sparkling, attractive and "easily whistled," in other words. It has all the elements of popularity, and will undoubtedly extend the reputation of its accomplished author."

"The Tender Glance Schottisch." Fine for dancing, quite easy and very beautiful. 30 cents each.

New Music at Mrs. Parkhurst.--We cheerfully call attention to Mrs. Parkhurst's advertisement of new music, which appears in our columns to-day. There are some ten or fifteen compositions in all, many of which are exceedingly meritorious while all are above the average of such works. Mrs. Parkhurst is one of our most prolific native composers, many of her songs being familiar as household words. The fair author has a happy faculty of interblending word and melody, which results in most pleasing and memorable harmony, the benefits in most pleasing and memorable harmony, the benefits of which our readers may share by purchasing the music and studying the composition.--Brooklyn Eagle.

VOCAL.

THE NEW EMANCIPATION SONG.

This is a stirring Song and Chorus, written for the Hutchinsons and sung by them throughout the land. It is well adapted to the times. "If you wish to be commended, Let not Slavery be extended, But its reign quickly ended, In these United States.'

THE SOLDIER'S DYING FAREWELL.

This is another of Mrs. Parkhurst's latest productions. It has a charming melody, with a chorus beautifully harmonized, and is having a large sale. Chorus--Don't you hear them singing, Mother, Listen to the music's swell, Now I leave thee, loving Mother. God be with you, fare you well.

NO SLAVE BENEATH THAT STARRY FLAG.

This is one of the best songs of the kind ever written. The words are by the Rev. George Lansing Taylor. It has a fine chorus, and when well sung is calculated to infuse patriotism into the heart of every listener. "No Slave beneath that starry flag, The emblem of the free. No fettered hand, shall wield the brand, That smites for Liberty."

DEY SAID WE WOULDN'T FIGHT.

A very amusing negro melody, with a fine chorus; It is well adapted to the times. Chorus.--"Hi! hi! boys, we's a gwine home, Hi! ho! now for de fray.

LITTLE JOE THE CONTRABAND.

Another mirth-provoking negro melody.

THERE'S REST FOR ALL IN HEAVEN

A very beautiful song and chorus, in the key of E flat. "We still have this sweet solace left, There's rest for all in heaven."

COME RALLY, FREEMEN, RALLY.

A campaign song and chorus, very finely arranged. One of Mrs. Parkhurst's best "Hurrah, boys, hurrah, we'll work with all our might.

THEY TELL ME I'LL FORGET THEE.

This is an exquisite ballad, plaintive and touching, and one of the sweetest melodies Mrs. Parkhurst has ever written. It is arranged in A flat. "They tell me I'll forget thee, when 'Mid other scenes I stray, That thoughts of thee will vanish as The dew as break of day."

ONLY YOU AND I.

A charming little song, lively and very amusing. More especially designed for people in love. "When'er we walk together, love, And no one else is nigh, It seems as if the world was made, For only you and I."

I'M WILLING TO WAIT. Or, The Old Maid's Song

Another comic song, arranged with a beautiful accompaniment, very amusing. "Twas not such a very long time ago, At least, so it seems to me, Since I was a maiden, just in my teens, As pretty as I could be. But now they call me a poor old maid, And I'll own I'm thirty four, But I'm willing to wait, I'm willing to wait, With patience a year or two more."

MY JAMIE'S IN THE BATTLE FIELD.

A Scotch ballad, very pretty and taking. "My Jamie's on the battle field, And Oh, I miss my laddie so, My puir lane heart so fu of pain, I wish I had no let him go."

OUR DEAR NEW ENGLAND BOYS.

A very sweet and touching melody, with beautiful words and an excellent chorus. Key of E flat. Chorus.--Let them rest their work is finished Nothing now their sleep annoys, Angels guard the unbroken slumbers Of our dear New England Boys.

The above pieces are 30 cents each, mailed.

WERE I BUT HIS OWN WIFE.

One of Tom Moore's beautiful songs, set to sweet and appropriate music. A song that will be a favorite. "Were I but his own wife to guide and to guard him, 'Tis little sorrow should fall on my dear. For every kind glance my whole life would reward him, In sickness I'd soothe, and in sadness I'd cheer."

THERE ARE VOICES, SPIRIT VOICES.

This is one of the best pieces Mrs. Parkhurst has ever written. It is classical in style, yet simply arranged. It has a most beautiful chorus, with an accompaniment in imitation of voices. Chorus.--Spirit voices, hear the echo, They are calling us away, Where the roses never wither, Where the crystal fountains play."

A HOME ON THE MOUNTAIN.

A dashing spirited song in the key of G. Very brilliant and beautiful. "Let others sigh for a valley home, Where the brook runs murmuring by. I'll build my cot on the mountain's dome, Where it leans to the deep blue sky."

DO THEY LOVE ME STILL AS EVER.

Song and Chorus in the key of B flat. Very beautiful and becoming very popular. "Do they love me still as ever. In the old familiar way. Do they ne'er forget me, never, Though afar from home I stray."

OH, SEND ME ONE FLOWER FROM HIS GRAVE.

A very touching and beautiful song, with chorus finely harmonized. It is arranged in the key of A flat. "While the merry birds sing in the low branches near, And above him the green willows wave. Still warm with the sunshine and wet with the dew. Oh, send me one flower from his grave."

WAIT, MY LITTLE ONE, WAIT.

This is a pathetic little ballad, that touches the heart of every mother who has a little one in heaven. It is simply arranged it the key of A flat. "Wait, my little one, wait. When you get to that beautiful land. Tarry a little my darling one, Ere you join that heavenly land."

The above pieces are 30 cents each, mailed.

INSTRUMENTAL.

The Sigh in the Heart--Waltz sentimental. This is a charming piece of seven pages; brilliant and at the same time very sweet and not too difficult for ordinary players. Price, 40 cents.

Starlight Waltz.--A simple waltz, very pretty and designed more especially for players not very far advanced. Good time for dancing.

On to Richmond Galop.--A brilliant, spirited gallop, not very difficulty, and one that cannot fail to be popular. Price, 30 cents each, mailed.--

THE SUNNYSIDE SET.

A set of easy pieces arranged from popular airs, especially for young beginners:--"Three Rogueish Chaps," (Polka); "My Country," (March); "Sunny Side Rondo"; "Little Bird Waltz"; "Brave McClellan," (March); "What they do at the Springs," (Waltz); "They worked me all the day," (Polka); "There's no such girl as mine," (Gallop); "Was my brother in the battle," (March); "Shall we know each other there," (Rondo); "Little Ella's an Angel," (Quickstep); "Leave me with my mother," (M'rch); "Weep no more for Lilly," (March); "Why have my loved ones gone," (Schottische); "The Volunteer Polka"; "Cannon Gallop"; "Morning Dew," (Schottische); "Little Jenny Dow," (Polka); "Sweet Evelina," (Waltz); "When this dreadful war is ended," (Polka); "Merry little birds are we, (Polka); "There are plenty of fish in the sea," (Quickstep); "Norah Dearest," (March); "The Evacuation," (Dance); "Farmer Stubbs," (Dance); "Sweet little Nell," (Waltz).

The above pieces are all fingered. Price, 20 cents each, mailed free.

Status

Complete

Percent Completed

100

Weight

20

Original Format

5
34 cm

Citation

Clark, James G., “The Chicago Copperhead,” Chronicling Illinois, accessed June 26, 2019, http://chroniclingillinois.org/items/show/19999.